Metformin

Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. It is also used to treat polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Metformin belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. The exact mechanism of action of metformin is unknown, but it is thought to work by reducing the amount of sugar (glucose) that is absorbed from the food you eat and by making the body more sensitive to insulin. Metformin is available as a generic medication. Generic medications are usually less expensive than brand-name medications. Metformin is also available as the brand-name drugs Glucophage, Glumetza, and Riomet. Metformin may be used as monotherapy or in combination with other diabetes medications. Common side effects of metformin include nausea, diarrhea, and headache. Metformin can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Symptoms of low blood sugar include shakiness, sweating, fast heartbeat, and hunger. You should not use metformin if you are allergic to it, or if you have: severe kidney disease; metabolic or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment); a history of heart attack or stroke; if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment); or if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. To make sure metformin is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had: kidney disease (your kidney function may need to be checked before you take this medicine); liver disease; heart disease, congestive heart failure; a recent heart attack or stroke; severe or uncontrolled asthma; pancreatitis; underactive thyroid; a history of alcoholism; or if you are over 80 years old and have not had your kidney function checked. Metformin is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Metformin can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while using this medicine. Do not give this medicine to anyone under 18 years old. How should I take metformin? Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose. Use the medicine exactly as directed. Metformin is usually taken with meals. Follow your doctor's instructions about the type and amount of liquids you should drink while you are taking this medicine. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole and do not crush, chew, or break it. If you use the liquid form of this medicine, you will need a special measuring spoon or device to get the correct dose. Ask your pharmacist for one. Your blood sugar will need to be checked often, and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office. If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using metformin. You should stop taking metformin at least 2 days before having surgery or certain medical tests. Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. You should not use metformin if you are allergic to it, or if you have: severe kidney disease; metabolic or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment); a history of heart attack or stroke; if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment); or if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. To make sure metformin is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had: kidney disease (your kidney function may need to be checked before you take this medicine); liver disease; heart disease, congestive heart failure; a recent heart attack or stroke; severe or uncontrolled asthma; pancreatitis; underactive thyroid; a history of alcoholism; or if you are over 80 years old and have not had your kidney function checked. Metformin is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Metformin can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while using this medicine. Do not give this medicine to anyone under 18 years old. How should I take metformin? Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose. Use the medicine exactly as directed. Metformin is usually taken with meals. Follow your doctor's instructions about the type and amount of liquids you should drink while you are taking this medicine. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole and do not crush, chew, or break it. If you use the liquid form of this medicine, you will need a special measuring spoon or device to get the correct dose. Ask your pharmacist for one. Your blood sugar will need to be checked often, and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office. If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using metformin. You should stop taking metformin at least 2 days before having surgery or certain medical tests. Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Metformin 850mg

PackagePer PillPriceSavingsBonusOrder
850mg × 60 pills$0.8$47.88+ Levitra
850mg × 90 pills$0.72$64.64$7.18+ Viagra
850mg × 120 pills$0.68$81.4$14.36+ Cialis
850mg × 180 pills$0.64$114.91$28.73+ Levitra
850mg × 270 pills$0.61$165.19$50.27+ Viagra
850mg × 360 pills$0.6$215.46$71.82+ Cialis

Metformin 500mg

PackagePer PillPriceSavingsBonusOrder
500mg × 90 pills$0.39$34.88+ Levitra
500mg × 180 pills$0.32$58.14$11.63+ Viagra
500mg × 360 pills$0.29$104.65$34.88+ Cialis
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